Valley View Early College Campus

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Nurse's Office » School & Diabetes Mellitus

School & Diabetes Mellitus

WHAT IS DIABETES MELLITUS?
 
Diabetes Mellitus occurs when specialized cells of the pancreas (a gland located behind the stomach) do not produce adequate amounts of the hormone insulin. Insulin enables the body to process the nutrients (proteins, fat, and carbohydrates) to make body tissues, promote growth, produce energy, and store energy. These nutrients are broken down into glucose, a type of sugar used by the cells of the body as a source of energy. Glucose is fuel for the body to use.
 
HISTORY
 
For children and youth younger than 20 years, diabetes is on the rise with an estimated 215,000 children and adolescents with type 1 or type 2, or approximately 0.26% of this age group. Annually, from 2002 to 2005 -- 15,600 youth were newly diagnosed with type 1 diabetes and 3,600 youth were newly diagnosed with type 2 diabetes (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention [CDC], 2011).
 
DESCRIPTION OF THE ISSUE
 
Each student with diabetes is unique in his or her disease process, developmental and intellectual abilities and levels of assistance required for disease management.
 
Managing diabetes at school is most effective when there is a partnership among students, parents, school nurse, health care providers, teachers, counselors, coaches, transportation, food service employees, and administrators.
 
The school nurse provides the health expertise and coordination needed to ensure cooperation from all partners in assisting the student toward self-management of diabetes.
 
Below are some TIPS FOR TEACHERS OF STUDENTS WITH DIABETES:
 
 
Below is a link for more information on Diabetes Mellitus: